Verizon’s Fixed Wireless 5G Strategy?

Verizon may be positioning itself to capture financial benefit by deploying point-to-point 5G in the delivery of high-speed Internet to homes,

by deploying to markets dominated by competitors.

For Verizon, fixed wireless/point-to-point wireless has low developmental complexity compared to the deployment of 5G to cell phone networks, while also affording economic efficiencies.

Once delivered from a small-cell hub to the home, low-latency high-bandwidth 5G could then be extended directly into devices such as televisions, appliances, and home phones thereby eliminating the relevance of WiFi-networks and physical cables within the home. 

5G has the capacity to redefine our perceptions regarding wireless technology and Verizon may already recognize the untapped potential for growth and new markets in a new “Industrial Revolution.” 

5G use cases are likely to be envisioned and deployed over a ten to twenty-year life cycle. The deployment of 5G infrastructures, such as increased density of fiber optic cable and arrays of small cells, has significant cost and could create barriers to entry for followers and competitors. 

It makes business and economic sense for companies such as Verizon to pursue a long-term strategy while leveraging immediate efficiencies through the replacement of costly legacy infrastructure. In contrast, it seems that Verizon’s competitors are shifting their business models towards the provision of content.

Once delivered from a small-cell hub to the home, low-latency high-bandwidth 5G could then be extended directly into devices such as televisions, appliances, and home phones thereby eliminating the relevance of wifi-networks and physical cables within the home. 

5G has the capacity to redefine our perceptions regarding wireless technology and Verizon may already recognize the untapped potential for growth and new markets in a new “Industrial Revolution.” 

5G use cases are likely to be envisioned and deployed over a ten to the twenty-year life cycle. The deployment of 5G infrastructures, such as increased density of fiber optic cable and arrays of small cells, has significant cost and could create barriers to entry for followers and competitors. 

It makes business and economic sense for companies such as Verizon to pursue a long-term strategy while leveraging immediate efficiencies through the replacement of costly-legacy infrastructure. In contrast, It seems on the surface that Verizon competitors are shifting their business models towards the provision of content.

copyright W. Pollock 12/16/2018 w@wepollock.com edited by Mike Botwin